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Free April Sampler eBook!


For anyone seeking escape and mental stimulation during these trying times, I've made a whole month's worth of the Harvard Classics 365 project available for free download. 

This April sampler provides enough reading material for a whole month, including extracts from:

  • Darwin's Voyage of the Beagle
  • The Lives of John Donne and George Herbert
  • The Meditations of Marcus Aurelius
  • The Autobiography of Benvenuto Cellini
  • Poetry by Browning, Wordsworth

And much more!

The April Sampler is available in PDF, ePub and Mobi formats, to enable you to read on your e-reader device. Feel free to download and share to your heart's content, I only ask that you attribute the sampler to the Harvard Classics 365 Project.

Download your preferred format:


If you enjoy this free sampler, please consider purchasing the complete eBook, Harvard Classics 365: A Liberal Education in a Year from the Kindle store. It's currently priced at only $2.99 USD, that's less than a cup of coffee from your favourite chain for an entire year of reading material!

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