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Harvard Classics advertisement in Life Magazine, 1922

Via Hatwoman
While browsing for photos of the Harvard Classics anthology, I came across this amazing advertisement from a copy of Life Magazine published in 1922. What an amazing ad!

I can't help wondering if the "booklet" described is in fact the same reading guide we're using as the basis for the HC365 project...

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